Sunday, July 14, 2013

How to Make a Shade Garden










Sometimes planting a garden where there's a lot of shade can be tricky. With a little planning, though, it can be done. Here's how to do it:

 1. Determine what type of shade you have - complete shade, or partial shade. This will help you figure out what plants to use.

 2. Take a look at your soil. Is it damp and heavy? If so, you may need to add a little sand for drainage. Is it sandy? Then you may have to add some garden soil.

 3. Select your plants. Here's a list of plants I like for partial shade (areas under trees or areas that receive sunlight several hours a day): Coleas, impatiens, bleeding hearts, azaleas, columbine, begonias (a very versatile plant), and astilbe. For areas of medium shade, I like hostas, ferns, lily of the valley, hydrangeas, and rhododendron. There aren't a lot of plants that do well in heavy shade, so you'd probably have to opt for mosses and violets in those cases.

 4. Plant tall plants in the back and shorter ones in the front. Mix foilage and flowers to create interesting texture and visual appeal.

 5. If you have the space, you can finish it off with garden ornaments like benches and small statues.

6 comments:

  1. A moss garden - that I could probably grow.

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    1. Yes - it's pretty hard to kill moss!

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  2. I have a friend with a very shady backyard, but the Texas heat can still be unbearable. She's had to work hard to find the right mix of plants and flowers that will accept shade and oppressive dry heat/minimal rain.

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    1. Texas is a unique climate. Probably the plants I mentioned would not work well where you live.

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  3. Hi Sherry,

    Excellent information you have given. In my case, I'm an expert when it comes to a shady garden. I have had to utilise the best I can because a huge oak tree dominates the garden and sucks up the water. The tall plants in the background and the shorter ones in the foreground is always a good idea. Although, I can slightly get around it because my garden is on a slope.

    Take care, my friend.

    Gary

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    1. I really like the pictures of your garden - and the wee folk!

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